July 12, 2013

And we wonder why there is a physician shortage?

23 percent plan to leave medicine or are at least considering doing so.

23 percent plan to leave medicine or are at least considering doing so.

In August, I’m headed to sunny Tucson, AZ, for the annual Association of Physician Recruiters (ASPR) Conference. Along with my friend and colleague Emerson Moses of One Medical Group, I’ll present on how technology is changing recruitment. Thanks to our partnership with MDLinx.com, we’ll have great data from our 2013 market research survey on physicians and how they seek employment.

We’ll take an in-depth look at our research study details during our August 13 presentation, but here are some other fascinating statistics to hold you over until then (cardiologist turnover rates are really high!).

Market Profile of U.S. Cardiologists (via Cegedim Relationship Management)

  • Cardiology move rate is almost 12 percent.
  • Cardiologists are leading the way in adopting electronic health records.
  • About 26 percent of cardiologists are online, participating in social media and maintaining a strong blog presence.
  • Cardiologists are less likely to be reached through email than their colleagues.

Filling the Void (via Jackson Healthcare)

  • “When asked for the likelihood they would encourage a young person to enter the medical field as a physician, 59 percent reported being unlikely to recommend the medical profession.”
  • “Forty-two percent of respondents reported being dissatisfied, with 17 percent saying they were very dissatisfied in their medical practice.”
  • “Seventy-seven percent of respondents have definite plans to practice medicine in the next year.” That means 23 percent plan to leave medicine or are at least considering doing so.
  • Top three reasons cited for leaving medicine in 2013:
  1. Burned out (60 percent)
  2. Don’t want to practice in era of healthcare reform (58 percent)
  3. Economic factors such as malpractice insurance, overhead, EMR, etc. (50 percent)
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